Office of the Provost

Career Development and Resources for Faculty

The Office of the Provost strives to create an environment of success for faculty.  Many resources are available to faculty throughout their careers at the University of Pittsburgh, including resources to support teaching and research, work/life balance, and health and safety. 

The Office of the Provost is also committed to professional development opportunities for faculty, which include New Faculty Orientation and an annual retreat for all department and division chairs, associate deans, and regional campus Vice Presidents.  Faculty development workshops are offered throughout the year to facilitate productive and rewarding academic careers for all faculty.  In addition, faculty interested in administrative roles can take advantage of workshops related to academic leadership. 

The Office of the Provost also works closely with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to promote excellence and innovation in teaching.  Many workshops related to teaching and learning are available through the Teaching Center.  The Teaching Resource Guide for Full-Time and Part-Time Faculty has been developed to provide all faculty with some helpful University resources, tools, and information that are designed to enhance your teaching role as a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh.  One of the key initiatives is the annual Provost’s Diversity Institute for Faculty Development, which seeks to increase faculty awareness about diversity and the capacity to teach in a diverse, multicultural environment.

 

-----

Upcoming Events

Year of Diversity

The 2016-17 academic year has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost. You can find Provost Beeson’s remarks at the University Times.

You can find information about upcoming diversity events through the Year of Diversity website.

"Academics as Leaders: Becoming More Effective and Efficient" Workshop Series

Creating Change: Agility and Execution with Dr. Ravi Madhavan, Professor of Business Administration, Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business

Wednesday, February 22, 2017
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
David Lawrence Hall, Room 211
Boxed lunches will be served

In today’s world, change is the only constant, and the ability to adapt is critical for departments and schools. But organizing and leading change is hard. In this workshop, we discuss a strategic approach to change management. The workshop integrates practical examples and best practices with the latest knowledge in human behavior, network dynamics, communication, and process management. Attendees will leave with greater insight and a practical toolkit for managing change.

Register at: http://tinyurl.com/ht3evpw
Registration is required.

Effective Conversations on Difficult Topics with Alice Pescuric, Talent Management Consultant

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Conference Room A, University Club
Boxed lunches will be served

Do you ever dread having conversations you know you should have, or steer clear of them entirely? Many people do, and for different reasons—perhaps to avoid the uncomfortable feelings that arise when discussing a conflict. You might be trying to protect a relationship you value. Maybe you aren’t as confident as you’d like to be in your ability to navigate through a contentious discussion. And yet, in all likelihood, ignoring the issue won’t improve the situation. In this engaging and interactive session, attendees are provided with practical tools and techniques for enhancing your confidence and effectiveness in tackling challenging or uncomfortable discussions. Come to this session prepared with your own personal example of a challenging discussion you need to have—we’ll help you explore ways to improve your outcomes.

Register at: http://tinyurl.com/jlm9er7
Registration is required.

Fundraising Fundamentals: Engaging Alumni and Potential Donors, Making an Ask, Stewardship with Maura Farrell, Associate Head for Strategic and External Affairs, Winchester Thurston School

Thursday, April 6, 2017
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
David Lawrence Hall, Room 211
Boxed lunches will be served

In this interactive session we will focus on three core skills in fundraising: engagement, solicitation, and stewardship. Attendees will learn to think strategically about the process of fundraising from initial contact with potential donors to follow up with donors. The focus will be on take-aways that can be applied immediately.

Register at: http://tinyurl.com/j6xy76g
Registration is required.

“How Bias Creeps into Decision Making and How to Minimize Its Impact” Workshop Series


“Recruiting an Excellent and Diverse Faculty: Mitigating the Effects of Implicit Bias in Decision-Making” with Dr. Kathleen Blee, Associate Dean, Chair of the Diversity Committee, and Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences

Friday, February 10, 2017
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
David Lawrence Hall, Room 211
Boxed lunches will be served

In this session, Dr. Blee presents a protocol developed by the Dietrich School Diversity Committee to mitigate the effect of implicit bias in faculty recruiting and graduate student admissions.

Register at: http://tinyurl.com/zz3ufr8
Registration is required.

Diversity in the Curriculum and Inclusion in the Classroom

A number of programs designed to build faculty awareness and capacity to teach a diverse, multicultural audience and to create a classroom environment that is inclusive and welcoming are sponsored by the University Center for Teaching and Learning and are available to Pitt faculty.

Understanding Our Students: A Series Exploring the Rich Diversity of Our Student Population features a Pitt faculty facilitator and a panel of students to discuss perspectives of specific student populations. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Diversity in Modern Culture: Movies, Popcorn and Inclusivity is a series considering diversity in the context of popular culture with four unique films. At the conclusion of each film, faculty will facilitate a discussion. The conversation will consider how the film portrays marginalized groups, how those groups are represented in society, and how marginalized groups might feel in classes at Pitt.

For more information about these series and to register, visit the Teaching Center website.